Cameron’s “British values” enshrine political correctness

David Cameron’s definition of Britishness contains within it the  three central tenets of political  correctness: racial equality, gay rights and sexual equality. That means anyone, indigenous or immigrant, who does not agree with political correctness is, in NuTory Boy’s eyes,not British. 

This is decidedly sinister. It means that the official Government position now makes  illegitimate those who, for example,  wish to object to mass immigration on the grounds that it is a surreptitious form of conquest, anyone who refuses to accept that civil partnership is equal to marriage or those who reject the idea that sexual equality means there must be women in equal numbers to men  in  every form of employment.

Cameron is also being disingenuous. Just before the last general election the Equalities Act 2010 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/section/4)  was passed with all-party support. The Act  has jurisdiction over what are termed “protected characteristics” . These are:   age; disability; gender reassignment; marriage and civil partnership; pregnancy and maternity; race; religion or belief; sex; sexual orientation 

The key characteristics are  “race” and “religion or belief”.  The whole apparatus of UK public service (including schools) are required to “protect” all the categories. “Protecting”  race and religion or belief means in practise that multiculturalism will be preserved. To take one example, it will be impossible to teach British history honestly because it would be deemed either insulting or excluding to ethnic minorities.   Disability and marriage also offer opportunities for the reinforcement of multiculturalism.

The cultural fragmentation of the UK also has the devolution dimension. Where do  ethnic minorities actually stand in  a devolved UK? German-born Labour MP   Gisela  Stuart  writing in online  magazine  openDemocracy.net  in December 2005 described  the problem, whilst also gaily  insulting  the English:  “It  has only been in the last five years or so that  I  have heard  people  in my constituency telling me ‘I am not British –  I  am English’. That worries me.

“British  identity is based on and anchored in its political and  legal institutions  and this enables it to take in new entrants  more  easily than  it would be if being a member of a nation were to be  defined  by blood.

“But a democratic polity will only work if citizens’  identification is with  the community as a whole,  or at least with the  shared  process, which  overrides their loyalty to a segment.”   (Quoted  in  Birmingham Mail 18 11 2005)

The  problem  for  people such as Ms Stuart  is  that  Britishness  was destroyed by  devolution.  There is no longer a comfortable overarching label of British under which everyone can be placed.  All that is  left for the people of Britain to cling to are emotional ethnicities.  

The  situation   is most acute in England because  that  is  where  the majority of ethnic minorities in the UK live.  There is  hard  evidence that ethnic minorities in England  routinely do not think of themselves as  English.   In 2005,   the CRE  commissioned from the research  firm Ethnos  a  poll designed to discover how Britons   identify  themselves (http://www.cre.gov.uk/downloads/what_is_britishness.pdf).  A couple of passages  are particularly telling:

“In  England,  white  English  participants  identified  themselves  as English  first and British second,  while ethnic minority  participants perceived themselves as British. None identified as English, which they saw as meaning exclusively white people.”

“Britishness  was  associated  with  great  historical  and   political achievements,  but  only  amongst white  participants  (whether  from England,   Scotland  or  Wales),   not  those  from   ethnic   minority backgrounds”.

This tells us two things: ethnic minorities in England routinely reject the idea of Englishness and ethnic minorities everywhere in the UK have no identification with Britain’s past. So much for Britishness.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Anglophobia, Culture, Devolution, Immigration, Nationhood and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Cameron’s “British values” enshrine political correctness

  1. Pingback: Political Campaign Expert » Blog Archive » Cameron's “British values” enshrine political correctness …

  2. Pingback: Cameron's “British values” enshrine political correctness … -Political Fund USA

  3. Pingback: Cameron's “British values” enshrine political correctness … « Harrington Fundraising

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s